Miles 'wedtm' Smith

[RANT] EULA's and Staying Relevant

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Miles 'wedtm' Smith

DevOps Engineer for CRMSuite.


[RANT] EULA's and Staying Relevant

Posted by Miles 'wedtm' Smith on .
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[RANT] EULA's and Staying Relevant

Posted by Miles 'wedtm' Smith on .

Minecraft was released in 2009. Since then, it has been at the forefront of the indie game revolution that we see today.

In that time the game has evolved from the basic block breaking/gathering of the Vanilla game, to a game augmented primarily by the countless hours and hardwork of plugin/mod builders.

Recently Mojang has been discussing how they are re-enforcing some troubling content in their EULA. Basically, once you've paid Mojang your hard earned $26 for their game, they want the right to tell you what you can and cannot spend more of your money on.

I have hosted more MC servers than I care to remember, and have worked with nearly every top MC server out there in some capacity. These are hard working, honest people that provide ADDITIONAL content past what Mojang and Co. do.

These new EULA changes/enforcements are designed to wipe those people out of the Minecraft ecosystem in one fell swoop. Why? Good question. Their official position is that it's not fair to charge people for accessing game features. This, in my honest opinion, is a crock of bullshit.

I have never been restricted from playing the full VANILLA version of Minecraft by any server. I'm not even sure it's possible. When I connect to a server, I do so with the understanding that it's more than likely modded (because let's face it, who actually enjoy's vanilla MC anymore?). Those mods were not created by Mojang, they were community created.

The server is not ran by Mojang, it's ran by someone who pays a significant amount of money and time to run it properly. MC servers are horribly inefficent at resource management when you get above anything over 50 players, so the only logical next step is a larger server, or a clustered scenario using, yet again, a plugin from the community.

Some people would shout, "HEY! This is Mojang protecting it's customers!" I call bullshit. Put this same exact scenario in any other case, and you'll see how ludicrous it is.

Can you imagine if a car manufacturer told you that you weren't allowed to pay a shop to add a new stereo to your car? (Oh, but hey, we have an offcial tape deck we can install for $2k).

Can you imagine how fast an anti-trust lawsuit would happen if Apple suddenly forbid you from putting any 3rd party apps on your iPhone?

The sad truth of this is, it seems like an extremely obvious power grab. Kill off the big servers that make their money by selling ENRICHED EXPERIENCES to players. What's left after those are gone? Oh that's right, the extremely overpriced and feature-lacking Mojang Realms. Go figure.

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Miles 'wedtm' Smith

DevOps Engineer for CRMSuite.